150719 Introduction to Rotator Cuff Injuries part 1

150719 Introduction to Rotator Cuff Injuries part 1

By Danny ’Dell, M.A.CSCS

The more you regularly exercise, the more you are exposed to an injury of these four small muscles of the shoulder. In addition to the training demands, they are pulled, stretched and in general abused by normal daily living activities. As we get older, the chronic abuse begins to catch up to us as the shoulder tightens up, and then becomes sore to use leaving pain as a result. Most injuries are preventable, if correctly managed in the first place.

Some of the problems are chronic degeneration of the joint, calcium deposits, tears in the muscles or tendons, impingements (one body structure impinging on another), muscle imbalances, biomechanical dysfunctional shoulder and many others including fibrosis and sports injury. These can be serious problems affecting training and daily living long term.

Thanks for reading this article.

Here is another blog you may be interested in, especially if you are nearing retirement age or are already there.

https://activelyfitseniors.blog/ is focused on the older generation with such topics as Aerobic Training, Anaerobic Exercise, Balance, Training Benefits Of Exercise, Body Composition, Equipment, Fitness, Flexibility, Miscellaneous Info, and Physical Activity presented by professionals in the field.

080719 Are you at Risk for Hyponatremia? Part 2

010719 Are you at Risk for Hyponatremia? Part 1

“A sustained decrease in plasma sodium concentration disrupts the osmotic balance across the blood brain barrier, resulting in a rapid influx of water into the brain. This causes brain swelling and a cascade of increasingly severe neurological responses (confusion, seizure, and coma) that can culminate in death from rupture of the brain stem. The faster and lower the blood sodium falls, the greater the risk of life threatening consequences”.

Symptoms of non-fatal hyponatremia may include no symptoms or relatively moderate gastrointestinal disturbances such as bloating or mild nausea.

As Hyponatremia progresses, the symptoms become more severe and may include a throbbing headache, vomiting, wheezy breathing, swollen hands and feet, restlessness, unusual fatigue, confusion and disorientation.

The final stages of the condition will display seizures, respiratory arrest, coma, permanent brain damage, and death becomes more likely.

The main cause of hyponatremia is too much fluid in the system. However, it can also result from excessive sweating and dehydration from the lack of fluid. The mechanism of injury in both cases is an unbalanced state of the sodium in the system.

This risk can be reduced by making certain that fluid intake does not surpass the sweat loss and by the ingestion of fluids containing sodium to replace that lost in the sweat. (Reference 1)

Suggestions for avoiding potential dehydration/hyponatremia problems

• Water at 5 Degrees Celsius is most useful in recovery from a dehydrated state. In large quantities, fluid at 15-21 degrees Celsius is normally preferred. (page 810 reference #2)

• Encourage the ingestion of 13-20 ounces of cold fluids 20 minutes before suiting up and some of these dangers can be avoided.(page 510 reference #2)

• Drink fluids at the same rate they are being depleted or at least close to 80% of the sweating rate.(Page 77 reference #2)

• A good rule of thumb to follow is that one pound of weight loss represents a loss of one pint of body fluid. This fluid needs to be replaced quickly to move it from the digestive track into the body where it is needed. Gulp instead of sip.

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References:

1. Sports Science Exchange by Bob Murray and John Stofan 2003

2. Exercise Physiology by William D Cradle, Frank I. Ketch, and Victor L Ketch. Lippincott Williams and Wilkins. © 1996

010719 Are you at Risk for Hyponatremia? Part 1

010719 Are you at Risk for Hyponatremia? Part 1

For a long time we have been told to drink, drink, and drink more fluids to keep us well hydrated. Well it just so happens, you can, in fact, drink too much!

Pronounced hi”po-nah-tre’me-ah, it means a deficiency of sodium in the blood or salt depletion. Put more medically it “is a disorder in fluid-electrolyte balance that results in abnormally low plasma sodium concentration”. Although rare, this can be a lethal condition if left medically untreated.

If you are a “salty sweater” and are a small framed, light-bodied individual, you may be at risk before your heavier partners. A small body means it takes less fluid to dilute the extra cellular fluid. Losses of a large amount of sweat and/or salty sweat increase the rate of sodium loss in the body. Add in the extra water without sodium and the stage is set.

Drinking too much before and during prolonged exertions in a hot, humid environment contributes to the condition. Hyponatremia is a situation whereby blood concentrations of sodium fall to an abnormally low level. This precipitates a rapid and dangerous swelling of the brain that in severe cases leads to seizures, coma and finally death. The way it does it is in this manner:

Thanks for reading this article.

Here is another blog you may be interested in, especially if you are nearing retirement age or are already there.

https://activelyfitseniors.blog/ is focused on the older generation with such topics as Aerobic Training, Anaerobic Exercise, Balance, Training Benefits Of Exercise, Body Composition, Equipment, Fitness, Flexibility, Miscellaneous Info, and Physical Activity presented by professionals in the field.

170619 The bench press endurance test

170619 The bench press endurance test

Although the one rep max is the gold marker for a bench press there are other ways to determine if the athlete is within the standards for their age and weight groups. The accepted test for gender and age comparison is the YMCA bench press test.

The test requires a male to lift 80 lbs and a female to lift 35 lbs as many times as possible with a metronome set at 60 beats/minute.

The test is terminated when the individual cannot completely extend the elbows during a lift or cannot keep pace with a metronome set at 60 beats/minute.

The standard norms of strength for the bench press are expressed in the following charts coming up next. If you are not within the healthy category then it’s time to start a more aggressive strength training program. A physically fit healthy range is above average up to excellent. Anything less is settling for mediocrity.

Female Age 
18-25
Age
26-35
Age
36-45
Age
46-55
Age
56-65
Age
66+
Excellent 50-36 48-33 46-28 46-26 34-22 26-18
Good 32-28 29-25 25-21 22-20 20-16 14-12
Above average 25-22 22-20 20-17 17-13 15-12 11-9
Average 21-18 18-16 14-12 12-10 10-8 8-5
Below average 16-13 14-12 11-9 9-6 7-4 4-2
Poor 12-8 9-5 8-4 5-2 3-1 2-0
Very poor 5-1 2-0 2-0 1-0 0 0
Male Age 
18-25
Age
26-35
Age
36-45
Age
46-55
Age
56-65
Age
66+
             
Excellent 45-39 43-34 40-30 35-24 32-22 30-18
Good 34-30 30-26 26-24 22-20 20-14 14-10
Above average 26-25 25-22 22-20 17-14 14-10 10-8
Average 22-21 21-18 18-16 13-10 10-8 8-6
Below average 20-16 17-13 14-12 10-8 6-4 4-4
Poor 13-9 12-9 10-8 6-4 4-2 2-2
Very poor 8-0 5-0 5-0 2-0 0 0

Similar tests compare age with the ability to correctly do the bent knee sit up.

100619 Cardiovascular and respiratory endurance training

100619 Cardiovascular and respiratory endurance training

The principle methods used to develop the cardiovascular and respiratory systems revolve around working below the anaerobic (without oxygen) threshold pace for both time and distance. This means performing a cardiovascular exercise at a pace fast enough to tax the physical response of the two but without going into the anaerobic ranges. The anaerobic range gets its turn at the end with a fast sprint to the finish line and you need superior strength to excel in nearly every physical activity. Taxing both the cardiovascular and respiratory systems is the goal of endurance (aerobic, with oxygen) training programs. Since the physical ability that is needed to move the limbs seems to disappear, first let’s look at this next.

Strength, as most can agree, is a vital component of training no matter if it’s endurance or power, you still need the strength to move your body. In the case of the endurance athlete, this strength comes from the development of strength endurance. A lack muscular endurance means you will not be able to go long distances if your muscles can’t continue putting out the force necessary to move the limbs.

The majority of endurance athletes lack muscular endurance. This is commonly seen at the end of a long race when one participant has a strong kick and the others fall behind at the finish line. Another example of this occurs when some of the athletes seem to be just barely moving their legs forward in a shuffle instead of a powerful stride to the end. However, is it all just in the muscles? Hardly so.

Respiratory fatigue precedes cardiovascular fatigue symptoms and therefore gives out sooner thus limiting the power output of the muscles engaged in the endurance activity. The respiratory muscles must be able to continue onward for long periods and still produce adequate power output to ensure a successful outcome.

Training muscular endurance requires high repetition numbers some even as high as two hundred to two hundred and fifty for one set. These are mentally hard training sessions and not ones for the faint of heart.

030619 Improving Joints Function by Daniel Pare

030619 Improving Joints Function by Daniel Pare

It all begins with the right approach to training.  Whether you are a beginner or a more advanced trainee you only need what is required FOR YOU to get results!  That is why analyzing a training program is So important.     

The more weight you persist on using under those conditions the weaker your muscles will become.  As for the joints, let’s not forget that if you are hurting you are certainly not getting results!         

You like to do negatives, forced reps, burn sets… and you do them regularly!  They are good except that they must be added to your workout in a way, that they will produce results.  Just make sure that they are used accordingly.  Consider utilizing sets of 5 reps and keep in mind proper form and technique.  Whether you are looking at weight loss, toning, becoming stronger, excel in sports activities and so forth, you need to approach training with that in mind.  By working out and emphasizing on remaining strong from start to finish, you will get the results you want.  Analyze what you are doing or have been doing and experience great results, quicker, and most importantly, injury free.  It is well worth it.  Daniel Pare, NCCP, CSO, CSPS, CSTS.
Certified Strength and Conditioning Coach
St. Thomas, Ontario, Canada
519-633-0771
Fax 519-637-1210 

270519 Improving Joints Function by Daniel Pare

270519 Improving Joints Function by Daniel Pare

It all begins with the right approach to training.  Whether you are a beginner or a more advanced trainee you only need what is required FOR YOU to get results!  That is why analyzing a training program is So important.     

As an example, if you are used to doing something that looks like this; bench-press, incline bench-press, and decline bench-press for 4 sets of 10 reps, that is well in excess of 100 repetitions for a chest work out.  You are doing too much!

Let me remind you of a simple fact, which will help you make the right decision when it comes to designing your own training program “Train To Remain Strong”. 

In order to make high repetition sets efficient one would have to workout at approximately 50% of what one’s strength level is (this is an average and some individuals will be able to use a little more).  This means that when you are doing bench-press for example, you should remain strong from the beginning to the end of that set.  The barbell should be pushed up evenly and straight up, your shoulder blades should be close to each others and remain that way, your abs kept very tight, your feet should not move, your buttocks should remain on the bench, and your head should not move.  You must be very tight and sturdy and remain that way for all those repetitions.  Does this seem like a lot?  

By doing sets of 10 repetitions at more than 75% of your strength level you are not working towards improving and maximizing joint function at all.  Remember that if the muscles are not strong enough to do the work, the joint is certainly not doing well!  Daniel Pare, NCCP, CSO, CSPS, CSTS.
Certified Strength and Conditioning Coach
St. Thomas, Ontario, Canada
519-633-0771
Fax 519-637-1210 
Email Stsa1258@aol.com

210519 Actively Fit Seniors—My New Site

210519 ActivelyFitSeniors.blog 

If you are retired or in the near future going to be retired this blog may be of benefit to you. Check it out and see what you think.

Another Actively Fit Seniors site is here at YouTube

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCCz367eM_GT65i3WTSPg9Ww/

Here is the Facebook site

https://www.facebook.com/Actively-Fit-Seniors-405746096649784/?modal=admin_todo_tour

If you are active, send over some videos of what you do to stay healthy. If they are approved then I will add them to the videos page. However, the downside to this is there will be no payment for these and by sending them over to me you are also giving me a release consent form  as stated ion the form below:

Video Consent and Release Form

Without expectation of compensation or other remuneration, now or in the future, I hereby give my consent to __________________________ [legal entity/organization], its affiliates and agents, to use my image and likeness and/or any interview statements from me in its publications, advertising or other media activities (including the Internet).

This consent includes, but is not limited to: (Initial where applicable)

_________ – (a) Permission to interview, film, photograph, tape, or otherwise make a video reproduction of me and/or record my voice;

_________ – (b) Permission to use my name; and

_________ – (c) Permission to use quotes from the interview(s) (or excerpts of such quotes), the film, photograph(s), tape(s) or reproduction(s) of me, and/or recording of my voice, in part or in whole, in its publications, in newspapers, magazines and other print media, on television, radio and electronic media (including the Internet), in theatrical media and/or in mailings for educational and awareness.

This consent is given in perpetuity, and does not require prior approval by me.

Name:

Signature:

Address:

Signature of the Actively Fit Seniors Representative, Danny M. O’Dell

No Minors are to be videoed and sent in for my review and approval. If sent, they will not be used on the ActivelyFitSeniors Facebook, WordPress or YouTube sites.

Revised 080419

200519 Exercise and rest period cycles Part 5 Overtrained

200519 Exercise and rest period cycles Part 5  Overtrained

How do you know if you are entering the overtrained realm? Listen to your body. Other clues to overtraining are more subtle. They include the following anaerobic indicators:Stages of Overtraining

1. No effect on performance 
Altered neural functions

2. Probably an effect on performance 
Altered motor unit recruitment
Altered sympathetic activity and hypothalamic control

3. Probably decreased performance 
Decreased motor coordination
Altered excitation contraction coupling
Decreased muscle glycogen
Increased resting heart rate and blood pressure
Altered immune function
Altered hormonal concentrations

4. Decreased performance
Decreased force production
Decreased glycolytic capacity
Sickness and infection
Emotional and sleep disturbances

Adapted from Essentials of Strength Training and Conditioning by Baechle and Earl

060519 Exercise and rest period cycles Part 3 Background information continued

060519 Exercise and rest period cycles Part 3  Background information continued

In 1954, Hans Selye came up with a description that described how an organism adapted to sources of stress in their environment. He called the model the “General Adaptation Syndrome” aka GAS. From this modest start, strength and conditioning specialists have come up with all sorts of training plans. A well-designed program will be characterized by a continuation of the Eustress processes. On the other hand, stagnation, soreness, minor injuries, and a lack of desire to exercise provide an early indication of distress that eventually leads to “Overtraining”. Leading into the overtraining is a condition called overreaching.

Overreaching is a desired effect that results from setting and achieving goals. It is the push to a higher plateau of ability. But if you remain in this zone too long, you soon reach the overtrained condition. Recovery from over reaching is easily accomplished with a few days active rest, a lighter than normal load, intensity and frequency of effort. How do you know if you are entering the overtrained realm?