240619 Starting out with a sensible training program

240619 Starting out with a sensible training program

A sensible training program not only includes resistance exercise but also aerobic endurance, balance, fall prevention, and flexibility components as well. However, sometimes these programs have to be modified to meet the physical needs of the person. Each of us is unique with the physical limitations we are dealing with as we age.

Arthritis, cardiovascular disease, diabetics, cancer, osteopenia, osteoporosis, back pain, obesity and overall frailty for those who are advanced in years must be taken into consideration when planning a fitness program.

It is a well-known fact that aerobic and anaerobic exercise brings a multitude of benefits to the fitness trainee. It has been said that there is not another age group that will benefit from exercise as much as those who are over fifty years of age.

The mainstream media has boasted of the myriad of health benefits that are associated with cardio exercise such as riding a bike, rowing, stair stepping and simply walking at a brisk pace. Working your cardiovascular system is great but don’t forget to strength train too. 

170619 The bench press endurance test

170619 The bench press endurance test

Although the one rep max is the gold marker for a bench press there are other ways to determine if the athlete is within the standards for their age and weight groups. The accepted test for gender and age comparison is the YMCA bench press test.

The test requires a male to lift 80 lbs and a female to lift 35 lbs as many times as possible with a metronome set at 60 beats/minute.

The test is terminated when the individual cannot completely extend the elbows during a lift or cannot keep pace with a metronome set at 60 beats/minute.

The standard norms of strength for the bench press are expressed in the following charts coming up next. If you are not within the healthy category then it’s time to start a more aggressive strength training program. A physically fit healthy range is above average up to excellent. Anything less is settling for mediocrity.

Female Age 
18-25
Age
26-35
Age
36-45
Age
46-55
Age
56-65
Age
66+
Excellent 50-36 48-33 46-28 46-26 34-22 26-18
Good 32-28 29-25 25-21 22-20 20-16 14-12
Above average 25-22 22-20 20-17 17-13 15-12 11-9
Average 21-18 18-16 14-12 12-10 10-8 8-5
Below average 16-13 14-12 11-9 9-6 7-4 4-2
Poor 12-8 9-5 8-4 5-2 3-1 2-0
Very poor 5-1 2-0 2-0 1-0 0 0
Male Age 
18-25
Age
26-35
Age
36-45
Age
46-55
Age
56-65
Age
66+
             
Excellent 45-39 43-34 40-30 35-24 32-22 30-18
Good 34-30 30-26 26-24 22-20 20-14 14-10
Above average 26-25 25-22 22-20 17-14 14-10 10-8
Average 22-21 21-18 18-16 13-10 10-8 8-6
Below average 20-16 17-13 14-12 10-8 6-4 4-4
Poor 13-9 12-9 10-8 6-4 4-2 2-2
Very poor 8-0 5-0 5-0 2-0 0 0

Similar tests compare age with the ability to correctly do the bent knee sit up.

100619 Cardiovascular and respiratory endurance training

100619 Cardiovascular and respiratory endurance training

The principle methods used to develop the cardiovascular and respiratory systems revolve around working below the anaerobic (without oxygen) threshold pace for both time and distance. This means performing a cardiovascular exercise at a pace fast enough to tax the physical response of the two but without going into the anaerobic ranges. The anaerobic range gets its turn at the end with a fast sprint to the finish line and you need superior strength to excel in nearly every physical activity. Taxing both the cardiovascular and respiratory systems is the goal of endurance (aerobic, with oxygen) training programs. Since the physical ability that is needed to move the limbs seems to disappear, first let’s look at this next.

Strength, as most can agree, is a vital component of training no matter if it’s endurance or power, you still need the strength to move your body. In the case of the endurance athlete, this strength comes from the development of strength endurance. A lack muscular endurance means you will not be able to go long distances if your muscles can’t continue putting out the force necessary to move the limbs.

The majority of endurance athletes lack muscular endurance. This is commonly seen at the end of a long race when one participant has a strong kick and the others fall behind at the finish line. Another example of this occurs when some of the athletes seem to be just barely moving their legs forward in a shuffle instead of a powerful stride to the end. However, is it all just in the muscles? Hardly so.

Respiratory fatigue precedes cardiovascular fatigue symptoms and therefore gives out sooner thus limiting the power output of the muscles engaged in the endurance activity. The respiratory muscles must be able to continue onward for long periods and still produce adequate power output to ensure a successful outcome.

Training muscular endurance requires high repetition numbers some even as high as two hundred to two hundred and fifty for one set. These are mentally hard training sessions and not ones for the faint of heart.

030619 Improving Joints Function by Daniel Pare

030619 Improving Joints Function by Daniel Pare

It all begins with the right approach to training.  Whether you are a beginner or a more advanced trainee you only need what is required FOR YOU to get results!  That is why analyzing a training program is So important.     

The more weight you persist on using under those conditions the weaker your muscles will become.  As for the joints, let’s not forget that if you are hurting you are certainly not getting results!         

You like to do negatives, forced reps, burn sets… and you do them regularly!  They are good except that they must be added to your workout in a way, that they will produce results.  Just make sure that they are used accordingly.  Consider utilizing sets of 5 reps and keep in mind proper form and technique.  Whether you are looking at weight loss, toning, becoming stronger, excel in sports activities and so forth, you need to approach training with that in mind.  By working out and emphasizing on remaining strong from start to finish, you will get the results you want.  Analyze what you are doing or have been doing and experience great results, quicker, and most importantly, injury free.  It is well worth it.  Daniel Pare, NCCP, CSO, CSPS, CSTS.
Certified Strength and Conditioning Coach
St. Thomas, Ontario, Canada
519-633-0771
Fax 519-637-1210