270519 Improving Joints Function by Daniel Pare

270519 Improving Joints Function by Daniel Pare

It all begins with the right approach to training.  Whether you are a beginner or a more advanced trainee you only need what is required FOR YOU to get results!  That is why analyzing a training program is So important.     

As an example, if you are used to doing something that looks like this; bench-press, incline bench-press, and decline bench-press for 4 sets of 10 reps, that is well in excess of 100 repetitions for a chest work out.  You are doing too much!

Let me remind you of a simple fact, which will help you make the right decision when it comes to designing your own training program “Train To Remain Strong”. 

In order to make high repetition sets efficient one would have to workout at approximately 50% of what one’s strength level is (this is an average and some individuals will be able to use a little more).  This means that when you are doing bench-press for example, you should remain strong from the beginning to the end of that set.  The barbell should be pushed up evenly and straight up, your shoulder blades should be close to each others and remain that way, your abs kept very tight, your feet should not move, your buttocks should remain on the bench, and your head should not move.  You must be very tight and sturdy and remain that way for all those repetitions.  Does this seem like a lot?  

By doing sets of 10 repetitions at more than 75% of your strength level you are not working towards improving and maximizing joint function at all.  Remember that if the muscles are not strong enough to do the work, the joint is certainly not doing well!  Daniel Pare, NCCP, CSO, CSPS, CSTS.
Certified Strength and Conditioning Coach
St. Thomas, Ontario, Canada
519-633-0771
Fax 519-637-1210 
Email Stsa1258@aol.com

Author: ActivelyFitSeniors

Danny M. O’Dell, M. A., CSCS*D is the co-owner of The Explosivelyfit Strength Training Gym, located in Nine Mile Falls, WA. He is a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist, with the National Strength and Conditioning Association. He has a Master's Degree in Human Services and is a strength and conditioning coach in a local School District along with being a regular contributor to the Washington State Coaches Association magazine.