100918 1/2 Speed of movement

Speed of movement 100918 1/2

Lifting heavy weights requires power. The formula for power is P=mass divided by time. Training for speed must be ongoing, and productive, if results are to be seen. Speed of movement can be increased in normal training situations by one of two ways:
• Preceding the movement with a heavy weight using the same movement form
• Preceding with a lighter than normal weight still using the exercise movement form
Preceding the move with a heavier weight may increase the speed of the standard weight due to the increased excitation of the nervous system. The influence of the nervous systems response to the heavier weight carries over into the normal load thus allowing faster speed to be attained.

This effect is felt but is depend upon the difference between the heavy or light loads which lead up to the immediate lifting of the normal load. Additional parameters are the number of repetitions and the order of the alternating loads.

This sequential selection of loads will elicit a positive training effect: Heavy, normal and light.

The limitations to a forceful contraction straight through a move occur at the end of any concentric move. This is the joint activating the ‘braking effect’ about three quarters of the amplitude utilization in the joint.

Author: ActivelyFitSeniors

Danny M. O’Dell, M. A., CSCS*D is the co-owner of The Explosivelyfit Strength Training Gym, located in Nine Mile Falls, WA. He is a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist, with the National Strength and Conditioning Association. He has a Master's Degree in Human Services and is a strength and conditioning coach in a local School District along with being a regular contributor to the Washington State Coaches Association magazine.